Ruby on Rails | Ruby Programming | Rail Programming | Ruby on Rails Books | What is Ruby on Rails used for | Ruby on Rails Examples

Ruby on Rails | Ruby Programming | Rail Programming | Ruby on Rails Books | What is Ruby on Rails used for | Ruby on Rails Examples

Ruby on Rails | Ruby Programming | Rail Programming | Ruby on Rails Books | What is Ruby on Rails used for | Ruby on Rails Examples

Ruby on Rails, or simply Rails, is a server-side web application framework written in Ruby under the MIT License. Rail is a model–view–controller (MVC) framework, providing default structures for a database, a web service, and web pages. It encourages and facilitates the use of web standards such as JSON or XML for data transfer, and HTML, CSS, and JavaScript for display and user interfacing. In addition to MVC, Rails emphasizes the use of other well-known software engineering patterns and paradigms, including convention over configuration (CoC), don’t repeat yourself (DRY), and the active record pattern.



History of Ruby on Rails

David Heinemeier Hansson extracted Ruby on Rails from his work on the project management tool Basecamp at the web application company also called Basecamp. Hansson first released Rails as open source in July 2004 but did not share commit rights to the project until February 2005.

Technical overview of Ruby on Rails

Like many web frameworks, Ruby on Rails uses the model–view–controller (MVC) pattern to organize application programming.

In a default configuration, a model in the Ruby on Rails framework maps to a table in a database and to a Ruby file. For example, a model class User will usually be defined in the file ‘user.rb’ in the app/models directory and linked to the table ‘users’ in the database. While developers are free to ignore this convention and choose differing names for their models, files, and database table, this is not common practice and is usually discouraged in accordance with the “convention-over-configuration” philosophy.

Philosophy and design




Ruby on Rails is intended to emphasize Convention over Configuration (CoC), and the Don’t Repeat Yourself (DRY) principle.

“Convention over Configuration” means a developer only needs to specify unconventional aspects of the application. For example, if there is a class Sale in the model, the corresponding table in the database is called sales by default. It is only if one deviates from this convention, such as calling the table “products sold”, that the developer needs to write code regarding these names. Generally, Ruby on Rails conventions lead to less code and less repetition.

Trademarks

In March 2007, David Heinemeier Hansson filed three Ruby on Rails-related trademark applications to the USPTO. These applications regard the phrase “RUBY ON RAILS”, the word “RAILS”, and the official Rails logo. As a consequence, in the summer of 2007, Hansson denied permission to Apress to use the Ruby on Rails logo on the cover of a new Ruby on Rails book written by some authoritative community members.

 



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