J# Sharp Programming Language | Learn J# Sharp Programming | J# Sharp Programming Tutorial | J# Sharp Programming Example | J# Sharp Programming Books

J# Sharp Programming Language | Learn J# Sharp Programming | J# Sharp Programming Tutorial | J# Sharp Programming Example | J# Sharp Programming Books

J# Sharp Programming Language | Learn J# Sharp Programming | J# Sharp Programming Tutorial | J# Sharp Programming Example | J# Sharp Programming Books

Visual J# (pronounced “jay-sharp”) programming language was a transitional language for programmers of Java and Visual J++ languages, so they could use their existing knowledge and applications on .NET Framework.



J# worked with Java bytecode as well as source so it could be used to transition applications that used third-party libraries even if their original source code was unavailable[citation needed]. It was developed by the Hyderabad-based Microsoft India Development Center at HITEC City in India.

Fundamental differences between J# and Java

Java and J# use the same general syntax but there are non-Java conventions in J# to support the .NET environment. For example, to use .NET “properties” with a standard JavaBean class, it is necessary to prefix getter and setter methods with the Javadoc-like annotation:

/** @beanproperty */

…and change the corresponding private variable name to be different from the suffix of the getXxx/setXxx names
J# does not compile Java-language source code to Java bytecode (.class files) and does not support Java applet development or the ability to host applets directly in a web browser, although it does provide a wrapper called Microsoft J# Browser Controls for hosting them as ActiveX objects. Finally, Java Native Interface (JNI) and Raw Native Interface (RNI) are substituted with P/Invoke; J# does not support Remote Method Invocation (RMI)




 

Future of J#

In January 2007, Microsoft announced:

That Microsoft would produce an updated version of Visual J# 2.0, including a 64-bit redistributable version, called J# 2.0 Second Edition to meet customer demand for 64-bit runtime support. Microsoft released Visual J# 2.0 Second Edition in May 2007.
A retirement of the J# language and Java Language Conversion Assistant from future versions of Visual Studio. The last version, shipping with Visual Studio 2005, was supported until 2015.
Calling J# code from .NET 4.0 code would fail unless vjsnativ.dll was pre-loaded.
A link to download Visual J# 2005 Express Edition is no longer available from Microsoft’s website; however, the link which was previously available was still functional as of 2017.

Visual J# is out of mainstream support but “Visual J# 2.0 Redistributable Second Edition released in 2007, with support continuing through to 2017 (5 years mainstream and 5 years extended support) on EN-US locales.” Support for the Visual J# Version 2.0 Redistributable Package Second Edition will be discontinued from October 10, 2017.



 

 

Thanks for reading the post and keep visits for more updates.



About Ashok.cse

Hi, I'm currently studying for the Bachelor of Technology In Computer Science from Rajasthan Technical University. I am the web developer with 3+ years of experience. my range of developer services including creating the design for new apps and web platforms or building UI design for mobile, tablets or desktops. making UX designs wireframes and layouts concepts and redesigns websites are adapting to mobile and responsive design. I have worked with many clients. I am working professionally with WordPress And Adobe tools.

View all posts by Ashok.cse →

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *